Hannah Richardson (1712-Aft Aug 1765), d/o George or John?, m. William Hall, Miller, 1731, in PA, of Chester, Delaware, PA and Halltown (now in Jefferson County, West Virginia)

[Note:  See first of husband William Hall’s entry for introductory notes about publishment of this material and for background material that, of course, relates to his wife, Hannah.  Sherlene Hall Bartholomew (shb, hereafter).]
NAMESAKE POSTERITY: Of those known, William and Hannah (Richardson) Hall named a daughter Hannah (m. Samuel Harris). Hannah Hall’s eldest daughter Elizabeth (m. Isaiah Pemberton) named a second daughter Hannah (m. Isaac Duncan). Hannah’s daughter Sarah (m. Humphrey Keyes) had six daughters, none named after Hannah (unless Hannah had another name, unknown). However, Sarah Keys’ daughter Lucretia named four daughters, before deciding to name a son “Hanason,” (b. 1805, RIN 35265) after his grandmother? –shb 2 Mar 2002

See notes of RIN 26445, RIN 27187, and RIN 684. –shb 3 Sep 2000

1645–UPLAND OR CHESTER TOWN SETTLED BY SWEDES/BACKGROUND: It has been documented that Hannah m. William Hall in 1731, in Chester. Chester, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, by John Hill Martin, Esq. (Philadelphia, 1877), p. vii: “The precise date of the settlement of the old town of Chester is unknown. We do know, however, that it was first settled by the Swedes, probably about the year 1645. Its Swedish name was Upland. The Dutch called it Oplandt. The Indian name according to Campanius was Meco-po-nack-a [which he later explains was after a stream where large potatoes grew–shb], and finally William Penn, on landing there, on Sunday, Oct. 29, 1682, at the request of his friend Pearson, whose first name is unknown, gave the town the name of Chester, after the city of Chester in England, from which city Pearson came–Hazard’s Annals, 605. When I lived in Chester, the inhabitants called it affectionately ‘Old Chester’; now it is incorporated as a city and known as the ‘City of Chester.’ I propose to write of old Chester, as I knew it previous to 1860 . . . . Ebeling in his history of Pennsylvania says: ‘There was about the middle of this century (1650) two Swedish and Finish settlements, called Upland and Finland; the former afterwards received the name of Chester’ (Acrelius, 39) ‘none of these settlements, however, were of importance, not even excepting Upland, which was made the chief place of a Judicial district by the Dutch in 1668.'” [Note: I do not know if Chester figured that prominently in the lives of Hannah and William–this bears further research–Jesse F. Hall told me Jan. 2000 that there is reason to believe that Hannah and William moved to Frederick, Virginia shortly after their 1731 marriage at Chester, and Mom Ida-Rose L. Hall says she would not be surprised if they lived in Virginia before their marriage and went over the border for the ceremony. One Ancestral File entry placed William’s father as a Thomas of Concord, Chester, Pennsylvania, but on trying to trace the source of this entry by a David Richardson, I learned that D. Richardson is deceased, and no other relative of his could tell where he got his information. –shb

TO DO–CHECK BERKS COUNTY RECORDS: In 1752, a small part of Chester, Delaware, Pennsylvania, where Hannah and William Hall were married in 1731, became Berks County, so records of this county should be searched for information on this family. –shb 20 May 1999]

FATHER IS A GEORGE OR A JOHN RICHARDSON? BALDWIN/WM. RICHARDSON CONNECTIONS? January, 2000 I for the first time tried the genforum.com site and was referred to Jesse Franklin Hall, who e-mailed a 26 page report about descendants of William Hall I and Hannah Richardson and who also graciously answered a number of my questions, via e-mail. The most exciting information he gave me was his find that George Richardson is Hannah’s father. This he determined on finding George’s Frederick County, Virginia will, in which Jesse says that George mentions his daughter Hannah, wife of William Hall. J. F. Hall does not now have the will, but in a subsequent e-mail of 17 Jan 2000, adds this information: “I don’t know whether George Richardson was a Quaker or not. BUT, Hannah and William Hall were married 23 April 1731 in the St. Paul’s [my mother, Ida-Rose L. Hall had also found this record, previous to this–shb.] Episcopal Church in Delaware or Chester Co. PA per a church record I found. This strongly suggests the Richardsons were not Quaker. The fact that Wm and Hannah relocated to Frederick Co VA shortly after marriage could suggest they wanted to get away from the Quaker influence. Also George Richardson and family relocated to Frederick Co. VA because that is where he died and left his will. The Jan. 16 e-mail: I can’t remember whether George’s will gave his wife’s name or not. Probably if it did it only gave first name. . . .” After writing Jesse that I could not find a George Richardson will in Frederick County will abstract collections, he said to try other counties and that he was 99% sure he remembered “George” as the right name and that the abstract he found was in Berkeley, Frederick, or Jefferson counties. The search continues, trying to document this lead. [Note: More recently, Jesse has written shb, Oct. 2000, that for some reason he cannot pinpoint, he is starting to think that the man he found as Hannah’s father was a John, not a George.] Among Frederick Co. will abstracts, I did find one for SWORDS, WILLIAM, Borough of Wichester, made 14 Apr 1796; probated 3 May 1796. Sec: James Glenholmes, WILLIAM RICHARDSON, THOMAS BALDWIN (Frederick County, VA Wills & Administrations 1795-1816 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1983), p. 10). A Baldwin married one of Edward Lucas’s daughters (William, a son of Hannah’s, m. Elizabeth Lucas, dau. of Edward). –shb 27 Feb 2000

DAUGHTER OF JOSEPH AND ELIZABETH (BEVAN) RICHARDSON? Kathryn Lones Pyles sent shb Feb. 2004 a document she found there in Allen County, Ohio, about a Richardson family that went back to Joseph and Elizabeth, of Abington Monthly Meeting (known as “Dublin MM” from 1687-1710). This document listed Joseph and Elizabeth’s children, including a son Richard, I had not previously known about when I originally compiled a family group record for them (see notes I compiled for Joseph Richardon, RIN 7935). An Internet search revealed these children’s births as forming a consistent line until there was a large gap where our Hannah Richardson Hall might easily have fit into this family. I am now looking for more evidence that Hannah’s parents are Joseph and Elizabeth. So far, this evidence gives hope that this might be the case: 1) The years seem to fit; 2) We know from William Hall’s will that his wife Hannah had a brother Richard; 3) William and Hannah Hall named two of their children Joseph and Elizabeth, as did their son Anthony Hall, also our ancestor; 4) several of Hannah and William’s children married into Quaker families, which would indicate a family Quaker tradition; 5) [looks like I got interrupted at this point and never got back–shb.]

HANNAH CONNECTED TO A JOHN RICHARDSON? See 1730 notes of husband William, RIN 677. See also, notes of Robert Hutchinson, Yeoman, of New Castle, Delaware (RIN 12693), who in his will, made 1717, mentions a sister Hannah Richarson [sic], wife of John Richardson. –shb 24 Sep 2000, 24 Oct 2000

HANNAH CONNECTED TO PHILADELPHIA SILVERSMITHS? This item was sent shb by Kathryn Lones Pyles, 12 Apr 2004: “Sherlene, I was going through my drafts folder, and found this–I see I didn’t put the source for the info down” (I have since found several websites on the “Net” about Richardson silversmiths, including http://freepages.genealogy.rootswebv.com/~silversmiths/56/36254.htm –shb).

“The Richardson family represented three generations of Quaker silversmiths.

“Francis (b. 1681) came from a wealthy family allied with the Philadelphia elite. He was probably apprenticed to a silversmith, per Penn’s laws, though this isn’t known for certain. As a child, he did know Phillip Synge, Jr., another silversmith, and he drew in the margins of his lessonbooks. By 1701 Francis was a well-known silversmith with a chop on Front Street, who worked in gold as well. He was famous for fashioning silver shoebuckles for Letitia Penn, William’s daughter. Another pair of shoebuckles made for the wedding slippers of Elizabeth Paschall rest now in the Pennsylvania Historical Society.

“Joseph, Francis’ son, was considered to be the finest of the Richardson silversmiths. He was very active among Friends, including leadership in “The Friendly Society for Promoting Peace with the Indians by Pacific Measures”. In 1757 he struck medals that were presented to ‘Friendly Indians’. [Note: Hannah and William did name one of their sons “Joseph”–shb.]

“Joseph Jr., and Nathaniel, Joseph’s sons, were respected silversmiths, too. They were known for the ornaments they made for Native Americans. Joseph Jr. also built furniture as well as doll’s furniture for his nieces. (A tip of the broadbrim to Estelle Simms Hewson for the above info)” –shb 13 Apr 2004 [Note: What’s fun is that when I sent the above info. to my sister Virginia and her genealogy researching husband Barry D. Wood, Ginger wrote back that prior to getting this she had signed up for a course that would teach her silversmithing–it must be in the genes.]

LUCAS/HALL/RICHARDSON CONNECTION? Two sisters, Sophia Elizabeth and Margaret Richardson, daughters of Richard Richardson and Margaret Coale, married Peddycoard brothers, sons of Nathan Peddycoard and Sarah Lucas (see RIN 28446). Since Hannah had a brother Richard Richardson, this is a possibility to pursue. –shb 23 Feb 2001

1712–BIRTH: I had Hannah listed as born “Abt 1702,” note that a pedigree chart from Elke Hall (see note titled “WILLIAM A SCOTCH-IRISH EMIGRANT in spouse William Hall I’s notes) as sent by Jane Zellner O’Brien, lists her birth as “1712.” That would place her at age 19 when married in 1731. (However, Jesse F. Hall says he has found many discrepancies in Elke Hall’s reports (and researchers have also found discrepancies in Jesse’s research–we no longer think our William, husband of Hannah Richardson, is Jesse’s ancestor, as he believed), so as with all of us mortals, who make mistakes, despite our best efforts, this information needs careful verification.) A web search found a http://www.gbso.net/buc/PEM/PEMDESC/pafg25.htm site that would not open, but the description gave Hannah’s birth as 1710 and her d. as 1784, her m. as 23 Apr 1731 in Halltown [place not correct, she is “of Halltown,” but was married in Chester County, PA–shb]. –shb

QUAKER HERITAGE? BROTHER RICHARD: William Hall’s will mentions Hannah’s brother Richard Richardson, so in an effort to find Hannah’s parents, a search for her brother continues. Many Halls are found witnessing Chester, Pennsylvania Quaker marriages, along with Richardsons. Pyles show up as neighbors to Halls in Delaware County (Chester), PA. For a description of a typical Quaker wedding, see notes of RIN 17136 (a Pyle marries a Hall). –shb 24 Apr 1999 [Note: See notes of Hannah’s daughter Elizabeth for more Richard Richardson information and possibilities–shb.]

A HORSE THIEF BROTHER NAMED THOMAS? E-letter to shb from Jane Hall, 24 Jun 2002: “‘Spotsylvania Co., VA Court Orders 1738 – 1740. At a Court held for Spotsylvania County on Tuesday July the first anno Domini 1740 – Present His Majestys Justices: John TALIAFERRO, William ROBINSON, Francis THORNTON John EDWARDS, Gentlemen. – FRANCIS THORNTON JUNR. Gent. warrant and mittimus against GODFREY RIDGE and BENJAMIN BOUCHER for receiving harbouring and concealing THOMAS RIDGE and THOS. RICHERSON and a Black Stallion & one bright bay gelding belonging to HUGH FARGUSON knowing the same Horses to be by them stolen &c…..’ [Paragraph] The Richardsons also are part of the Hensley family. Wouldn’t it be ‘cool’ if the above Thomas ‘Richerson’ was related to Hannah?! We’d have a real horse thief in the family! . . .” The name of one of the justices, Francis Thornton, rang a bell, so I did a search and found that I and created an individual entry for him (see RIN 29071) that includes a deed indicating that Francis had a neighbor named William Lucas (a dau. of Edward Lucas m. Wm. II), and she had a brother William, b. 1742, so the name was in the family). The name Benjamin Boucher also brings to mind the fact that William I (and wife Hannah Richardson)’s son Anthony (our ancestor) had a son Anthony (m. Mary/Polly Ward), and they had two daughters, Ruth and Martha, who married Bowshers. Although I have found a number of Hall families in the area, I have so far only pinpointed one Richardson family, so I think there’s a good chance that this Thomas of the 1740 court (Hannah m. William in 1731) is Hannah’s brother or, at least, a relative. –shb 24 Jun 2002

FROM RICHMOND AREA? See notes of Francis Thornton, RIN 29071, for indication that Thorntons, Taliaferros, a Thomas Richardson, were in company earlier in Richmond–same Thomas Richardson family? –shb 24 Jun 2002

CHILDREN FRIENDS OR QUAKERS/DID HANNAH ATTEND TUSCARORA/PROVIDENCE MONTHLY MEETING? Hannah’s daughter Elizabeth married a Pemberton–were they connected to the prominent Quaker Pembertons? (See notes of Isaiah Pemberton, RIN 24024, for account of Civil War Quaker persecutions and Pemberton Friends who were exiled to Frederick County area, put under guard, and later given more freedom–perhaps housed in homes of their relatives.) Also, Hannah’s son William II m. Elizabeth Lucas, dau. of Edward Lucas, an active Quaker (RIN 17294, m. Mary Darke). It is known that Edward attended Tuscarora Meeting (2 l/2 miles northwest of Martinsburg, now in West Virginia, on the Tuscarora Pike). Did Hannah Richardson perhaps also attend there? –shb 8 May 2000

EARLY 1700s–AREA QUAKER MIGRATIONS/A JOHN RICHARDSON (WITH SON RICHARD) AT PENN’S QUAKER “NOTTINGHAM LOTS”: Cecil County Maryland 1608-1850, compiled by G. E. Gifford, Jr. (Calvert, MD: Calvert School Alumni Association, 1974), pp. 158-161, gives this migratory history for area Quakers: “About 1690 a group of Quakers, formerly of Chester, Pennsylvania, were settled in the neighborhood of New Castle, Delaware. Some of these Quakers, friendly with the Indians, learned that the country farther west was fertile and well drained. These early settlers were inclined to migrate to the rich valleys of the Pequia and Connestoga. Penn, fearful of losing those good people who were flourishing under his style of government, chose Andrew Job, who was prominent in the New Castle Settlement, to persuade his followers not to migrate from the area which Penn had claimed” [goes on to tell how in 1701, Penn designated a 40-acre plot west of New Castle, to Quaker worship, burial, and education purposes. Called “Nottingham Lots,” this tract was divided into rectangular lots, first owned by “John Guest, Henry Reynolds, John Richardson, Cornelius Empson, Ebenezer Empson, Joel Baily, James Cooper, James Brown, Randall Janney, John Churchman, John Beale, Edward Beeson, William Brown, Robert Dutton, Samuel Litter, and Andrew Job. It was not until after the drawing of the lots was completed that the men began to clear the land and build homes for their families. By the summer of 1702, smoke could be seen rising from a dozen cabins” (160). “. . . at Concord Monthly Meeting, held February 1705, ‘the Friends of Nottingham desire on Behalf of the rest a First Day Meeting at the house of William Brown and a Fourth Day Meeting once a month.'” The request granted, and Quakers at Nottingham Lots held meetings at the home of William Brown until the Brick Meeting House was built.] I do not know if the John Richardson who was a first settler here is connected to our Hannah Richardson, but this possibility certainly bears investigation. –shb 8/31/98 [Note: Concerning a John Richardson with dau. Hannah, this note was e-mailed shb 12 Sep 2000 by Jesse F. Hall: “I had requested from someone who did birth lookups in Chester Co. a list of births for Halls and Hannah Richardson. They showed a Hannah Richardson born, presumably in Chester Co, 16 Sept 1721 to John and Ann Richardson which I felt could NOT have been our Hannah because of age. Then I noticed you hd the same info in your files except showed who she married and apparently born in Delaware. As for the Halls they show a number of births after 1764, 6 of the births were to a Thomas and Mary, I don’t know who this might have been. Also 6 of the births were to a William and Lydia. I don’t know who this iwas either. I am sure the county for the abstract of George (if that is right) Richardson’s will was either Frederick or berkeley Co. VA. I don’t think it was Jefferson but could have been. The reference to Hannah as spouse of William Hall was down in the will. That’s all I can remember right now.” –shb 22 Sep 2000

1708–A RICHARD RICHARDSON OF NEWARK MARRIES ANNA ROBINSON AT DUCK CREEK MM–OF INTEREST SINCE THOMAS HALL OF CONCORD, D. ABT 1717, LEFT A WIDOW SARAH WHO M. GEORGE ROBINSON 10 MAY 1708, ST. PAUL’S CHURCH, CHESTER COUNTY, PA–WEDDINGS A WEEK APART: Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, Kent County, lists 5-19-1708 a Richard Richardson of Newark and Anna Robinson, m int. (Duck Creek was near Smyrna, in Lancaster Co., Pa.) On 3-17-1714 it lists MM held at a Richard Richardson’s at Little Creek (Little Creek was near Duck Creek) and on 1756 6 mo 21 (p. 59) lists HALL, William’s w Hannah rocf Concord MM, Pennsylvania (Concord Friends’ meeting was (and is) in Chester Co., PA–our William Hall married Hannah Richardson in Episcopal services, Chester, Delaware, Pennsylvania, in 1731). Also, 1775 7 mo 22, a William Hall dis for mou compl by DCPM 26 11 mo 1774. Also, 1762 12 mo 25, a William Hall dis for purchasing negroes as slaves against rules of YM. (I figure our Hannah Richardson Hall was born about 1702–was this Richard Richardson, m. in 1708, possibly an uncle? We do know that an 1800 Frederick Parish tax list included Williams who were probably son and grandson of William and Hannah Richardson Hall.–shb)

1750, 1762, 1774, 1786–A RICHARD RICHARDSON IS VESTRYMAN AT ST. PETER’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, BUILT NEAR WHITELAND, CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA: The township of Whiteland [near where St. Peter’s Episcopal Church was built] was organized about the year 1704, so is among the oldest townships in Chester County, Pennsylvania. Whiteland is the northwestern part of the original Welsh tract of 40,000 acres, which was laid out to that people in 1684, with the expectation that they should be a separate barony, with liberty to manage their municipal affairs in their own way. At first they desired to retain their native language, but this soon became impractical. Persons on the Whiteland Rate List of 1715 include James and Richard THOMAS, ISAAC RICHARDSON [caps mine–shb], Isaac Malin, Adam Baker, David Howell, Griffith Phillips, Evan Lewis. ISAAC RICHARDSON was listed in the township book as holding the office of constable prior to 1726, beginning with 1710: “To ye Honorable Richd Hayes Esqr, President, and to ye rest of ye Honourable Esqrs, Justices, at ye Court of Quarter Sessions held at Chester, February 1731. ‘The Petition of us ye subscribers Inhabitants of ye Township of Whiteland humbly Showeth that whereas most or all of us in our Successive Turns have been put to no Small difficulty in the Execution of ye Several offices of Constables, Collectors of ye County Taxes overseers of ye poore, Supervisors of ye highways &c partly thro ye obstinancy of Some Refusing their Quotoes or proportionals on Publick Emergencyes and occasions under pretext yt our Townships limits or District not having Certain boundaries on Record Renders our offices in their Several Requirings in Some measure faint and abortive, Wherefore your Petitioners humbly Craves yt a Recorde of our Township may be drawn according as ye boundaries herewith Sent in a rough plan Delinates, and your Petitioners In Duty bound pray for your prosperity. Signed Richd Thomas, William Paschall, Griffith Lewis, Saml James, Hugh Davies, Thomas James, Adam Baker, Thomas Morris, David Meredith, William Thomas, Richard Anderson, Henry Anderson, Thomas Evans, Morgan David, Theophilus Thomas, David Jenkin, Thos Test, George Hunter, John Hunter, Jacob Wright, Edw Kinnison, William Kinnison, Isaac Malin, Jr., RICHARD RICHISON [caps mine–shb], James David, James Rowland, Samuel Owen, Thomas Llewelin, Isaac Malin, David Howel, Evan Philips, Lewis William.’ Petitions were presented at the same time by Goshen township, and by persons on the borders of the two townships. A plot of the township, probably made to accompany the foregoing petition, represents the land-owners, beginning at the Tredyffrin line and south side, to have been James Rowland, Samuel Owen, Owen Thomas, Katharine David, Isaac Malin, William Paschall, John Sharpless, RICHARD RICHARDSON, Edward Kinnison, Jacob Wright, John Hunter, and George Hunter, in what is now East Whiteland. North of these were Reese Pritchard, Evan Philips, James David, Lewis William, David Jenkin, Theophilus Thomas. In what is now West Whiteland, a series of surveys appear to have crossed the valley, beginning with Morgan David, Thomas Evan, and Richard Anderson on the east, then, in succession, David Meredith, Evan Lewis, Griffith Howell, David Howell, John Morgan, Adam Baker, Richard Thomas, Thomas James, Thomas Morris, and John Spruce.” In 1743, a Reece Francis was appointed as a supervisor. [History of Chester County, Pennsylvania, by J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope(Louis H. Everts, Philadelphia, 1881), p. 218.]

1731–MARRIAGE, ST. PAUL’S EPISCOPAL: Hannah’s marriage was found by Mom Ida-Rose L. Hall [and has since been confirmed to shb, as also found by Jesse F. Hall] in the records of St. Paul’s Church, Chester, Delaware, Pennsylvania, which I presume was an early congregation, at least in spirit, of the Episcopal (Church of England) church described in the book, 1760-1898 Outline of the History of Old St. Paul’s Church, Philadelphia Pennsylvania, by Norris Stanley Barratt (Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, 1917), p. 25: “At the time of its organization in 1760, St. Paul’s was the third Church of England congregation in Penn’s fair city of Philadelphia, which then had nearly reached the age of four score years, and had a living progeny of eighteen thousand souls. By the City of Philadelphia, is meant the original city, two miles long and a mile wide, bounded on the north by Vine street, and on the south by South street, and extending east and west from the Delaware to the Schuylkill, containing 1,280 acres, or as it was, until the consolidation in 1854, by which the twenty-eight villages or districts, Southwark, Northern Liberties, Moyamensing, Spring Garden, Kensington, Richmond, etc., became the city of Philadelphia as it exists today.” P. 26: “The Church of England adherents had no settled clergyman of their own in Penn’s Quaker Colony until 1698, when Henry Compton, Bishop of London, sent the Rev. Thomas Clayton to Philadelphia, where he found a congregation of fifty persons which, in two years, increased to seven hundred. Clayton was called by the Quakers, the minister of the doctrine of devils [this might have made life interesting, if Hannah Richardson was a Quaker at heart, and William Hall, an Episcopalian–shb]. The Bishop of London, by virtue of a clause in Charles II’s Charter to Penn, was authorized, upon the request of twenty inhabitants, to appoint a chaplain to minister in Pennsylvania, which provision was inserted at the suggestion of Bishop Compton whose foresight in this respect is much to be commended. In 1695, the required number had met, appointed a vestry and purchased a lot of ground one hundred feet front on Second Street, on which, according to Gabriel Thomas’ publication of 1698, ‘a very fine church’ had been ‘built in the year 1695′”; p. 48: “Col. William Byrd, second, said, ‘The Quakers flocked to this country in shoals, being averse to going to Heaven the same way with the Bishops.’ This, in a humorous way, expressed the Churchman’s view of the Quaker. [Next paragraph] The Quakers and the members of the Church of England were the aristocratic class. In public life in early Pennsylvania there were two distinct types of men. The first, progressive, eloquent, earnest, learned and convincing. Thomas McKean, John B. Gibson, Jeremiah F. Black, William McClenachan and Joseph Pilmore represent the first class, although not of the same faith. The second, equally learned, but sure of their social position, quiet, colorless, retiring, modest, insipid, critical and uninteresting. This type dominated Christ Church, while the spirit and energy of the first animated St. Paul’s. St. Paul’s congregation had no divided allegiance, like some of the other English Churches in America. Its strength in this respect was that while loyal to the principles of the established Church, in all else, it was thoroughly American, and its aims, purposes and acts were those which have made the United States the nation she is today. Many of the ministers of the Church of England, and some of their congregations, resembled the attitude of the nobles in France, residing at Versailles in the time of Louis XIV, who were polished, but hard as granite, and who exacted from the people all the tributes and duties prescribed by the feudal laws, but who themselves had long ceased to render any service whatever. They were a liability instead of an asset to the State. They took all they could get, in fact, everything, and rendered nothing in return.” [See notes of Hannah’s husband William, RIN 677 for more on religion in early Virginia–shb.]

CHILDREN: Of Hannah, Margaret B. Adams writes, p. 2 of her report on the Halls: “What a woman: Six children in eleven years and none died even though four of them were so close that they could not have been nursed through the second summer when so many little ones died from tainted food. Perhaps a wet nurse helped?” [Note: By this note, Adams wrote in her own hand, “Speculation.”–Well, what is the fun in history, unless we do our best to read between the lines and into the hearts of what our people experienced–I appreciate her comments–shb, 28 Feb 2000.]

HOW THEY DID THE WASH: This was forwarded to shb, 24 Apr 2006, by Kathy Pyles, an active genealogy researcher on my Hall (paternal) side:

“THIS WAS JUST TOO GOOD NOT TO SHARE:

“Never thought of a washer in this light before. what a blessing! ‘Washing Clothes Recipe’ – imagine having a recipe for this! Years ago an Alabama grandmother gave the new bride the following recipe: This is an exact copy as written and found in an old scrapbook with spelling errors and all.

“Washing Clothes

“Build fire in backyard to heat kettle of rain water. Set tubs so smoke wont blow in eyes if wind is pert. Shave one hole cake of lie soap in boilin water.

“Sort things, make 3 piles
1 pile white
1 pile colored
1 pile work britches and rags

“To make starch, stir flour in cool water to smooth, then thin down with boiling water.

“Take white things, rub dirty spots on board, scrub hard, and boil, then rub colored don’t boil just wrench and starch.

“Take things out of kettle with broom stick handle, then wrench, and starch.

“Hang old rags on fence. Spread tea towels on grass.

“Pore wrench water in flower bed.

“Scrub porch with hot soapy water. Turn tubs upside down.

“Go put on clean dress, smooth hair with hair combs. Brew cup of tea, sit and rock a spell and count your blessings.”

On reading this, Charlotte (wife of my cousin, Sarah’s descendant, Bret Langford), writes, e-note of 24 Apr 2006:

“Sherlene,

“When I was 7 or 8 my parents had me sing a song about lye soap at a family reunion. It was quite a hit with the older folks there (this is a good 35 years ago). Here are the words to the song:

“‘Grandma’s Lye Soap’

“Chorus

“Let’s hear it for Grandma’s lye soap, good for everything in the place,
the pots and kettles, the dirty dishes, for your hands and for your face.

“Verse 1
Little Herman and Brother Sherman, had an aversion to washing thier ears,
so Grandma scrubbed them with the lye soap and they haven’t heard a word in
years!

“Chorus

“Verse2
Mrs. O’Malley down in the valley, had an ulcer I understand,
so she ate a cake of lye soap, has the cleanest ulcer in the land!

“Chorus

“Verse 3
Mrs. Mitty in Junction city, had some dandruff in her hair,
so she washed it with the lye soap and her hair is no longer there!

“Chorus

“End

“It’s a fun memory to think of the talent shows I sang this song at in elementary school back in Maryland in schools that were a good 60 % black, during the desegragation period in the 70’s. It actually went over quite well and helped break the ice in the racial tension that even I as an elementary student felt.

“Anyway, some good memories.

“Charlotte” [On reading all this, Shiron Wordsworth, a Langford descendant, sent this link she says she found recently, for making soap from lye: http://waltonfeed.com/old/soap/soapold.html, part of which I copy over here]:

“Soap Making – The Way We Used To Do It

“This page reflects one axiom of the true pioneer spirit found in an active little lady who intimately knew those times: use everything and don’t throw anything away. Anything can be used for something.

“The following information and recipes are told by Mabel Mertz (born 1912). © Al Durtschi
Note: These soap recipes are lye heavy. Look for the (updated lye requirements in parenthesis).

“Basic Instructions

“As we had no money to buy fat with when I was a girl, we made our own by rendering it when we killed an animal. We cut off the fat, cleaned it up, then cut it up finely with a knife. Then we put it in our big pots and cooked it until all that remained was the cracklings floating in the boiling fat. We drained off as much fat as we could, poured it into pails, and stored it in the root cellar. We used this to make pies, and to cook with. We put the cracklings away for another day when we would make soap out of them. The cracklings still had a lot of fat in them. In fact, the main reason we cooked the soap was to dissolve, or disintegrate the cracklings into the soap.

“On the day we made soap, we took the cracklings and put them in our big copper kettle. As they were heating on the stove, we added our lye, sprinkling the crystals on top of the cracklings. Then we added the water and started stirring it. We boiled this mixture until the cracklings disappeared. If there was any little pieces of meat in the cracklings they wouldn’t dissolve and we had to take them out with a wooden spoon, or lift them out on the end of our stirring stick. We continued to stir and boil it, checking it every 20 minutes or so to see if it was done. We did this by taking a spoon full out and pouring it on a plate. We knew it was done when it hardened to the consistency of soft cream cheese after it cooled. Sometimes there was streaks of water running through it. If this happened we knew it needed more water. We poured more water in, boiled it some more, then tried it again. If it ran off the stirring stick like water, we knew it had too much lye and needed more water. We knew it was right when it left a creamy layer on the stick. We didn’t have any recipes in the early days when I first learned how to make soap. After a bit of the mixture had cooled, I put it on the end of my tongue. If it’s bite was just right I knew I had the lye/fat ratio correct.

“When the soap had finished cooking, we poured it out of the kettle, sometimes as much as 4 inches deep into a small galvanized tub. The soap didn’t set up really hard immediately. I waited until the next morning to tip the tub upside down, knock the soap out of it, and cut it up into bar sized pieces. Then I sat the bars outside on a board to continue drying. It wasn’t too many days before it was ready to use. To store it, we threw it into a box.

“Sometimes we wasn’t get to the soap making right away and the cracklings went rancid. This wasn’t matter, however, as during the soap making process the lye cleaned them right up, and the soap that came from them was just as nice smelling as if we had used fresh cracklings.

“Home made soap makes great pre-wash. Get the clothes damp and rub the soap bar on the bad spots. It works as well as the expensive stuff from the store.

“I’ve seen dozens of soap making recipes. But let me tell you, as an old soap making expert, I haven’t seen any better soap made than the soap haven’t manufactured with the three simple ingredients: fat, lye, and water.

“A little Story

“Mother once told me a bit of a mean little story about something that happened before I was born. At the time she was in charge of the woman’s organization at the church. One of the ladies felt her family didn’t have as much money as the rest of them had and continually complained, ‘If we had as much money as you have, I could be like the rest of you,’ she said. You must keep in mind that in our little pioneer community, none of us had any money and we were all shabbily dressed! One day after tiring of listening to this woman, Mother asked her to come with her, took her outside to where our buggy was, and pulled out a box from under the buggy seat. Giving her the box filled with home made soap, she said, ‘Fine, if you want to be like the rest of us, take this home and use it!’

“Never Fail Soap

* 5 lbs cracklings
* 1 gal soft water
* 1 can lye (1 lb.) (This recipe lye heavy. Use 10.6 oz. lye)

“See the above information to see how long to boil it. Remove from heat and stir until thick. Perfume it if you like and pour it into molds if you prefer, in the wash tub it does a good job of cleaning soiled clothes.
Home Made Soap

* 9 lbs fat
* 1/4 lb. borax (optional)
* 1/4 lb. rosin (this makes the soap softer, but again optional)
* 2 small cans Gillette Lye (This recipe lye heavy. Use 19 oz. lye)
* 5 Quarts water

“Boil together for 2 or 2 1/2 hours

“Set for three days, then put in tight wood box lined with newspapers.
“The two recipes come from Mrs. Mertz’s little book she put together for the ladies of the community back in the 50’s called Remember Mama’s Recipes.” –shb 24 Apr 2006

1734/5–A RICHARD RICHESON/RICHISON WITNESSES WILLS IN WILLISTOWN, CHESTER COUNTY, 1735/36/ASSOCIATES WITH FRIENDS: Abstract of Wills of Chester County, Pennsylvania, Vol. I, 1714-1758, Prepared by Jacob Martin, Marshallton, Pa., Indexed by Gilbert Cope, 1900, p. 145 [full caps mine–shb]: “John William – Willistown, yeoman – Jany 4 1734/5 – Feby 2 1735/6. A. 450. To gr chil. Erasmus – Lydia – Elizabeth & John. chil. of my dau Elizabeth & Thomas Lloyd L5 each. & To Erasmus All my Books & Tools. To said dau Elizabeth the house & land whereon I live during life & afterward to said gr. son Erasmus – rem to son in law Thomas Lloyd also Ex. Witnesses – RICHARD RICHESON – Thomas X Lewis. [Note added in another hand: ‘Thomas and Elizabeth Lloyd made acknowledgment to Haverford MM 6-8-1700.’]” (Haverford MM was later named Radnor Meeting–is near Haverford, PA and is named in 1802 Hopewell records). On 9 Dec 1736 a Richd Richison witnessed the will of an Edward Kinnison, Ches Co., who directed that his body be buried in Goshen burying ground, mentions wife Mary, sons Wm, Charles, Edward, & James, daus Mary & Hannah; exrs. Friends Thomas Smedly & Thomas James [note added says “both of Goshen Mtg”–Goshen Monthly Meeting, sometimes written Gosham and Goshan, was in Chester Co., Pa., 4 miles northeast of West Chester–shb]; Witnesses RICHD RICHISON, John Woody [added note: “No doubt Richison but the Register made it Buhyon”–shb]. –shb 20 Jan 2000

1749–RELATIVE NAMED ABRAHAM RICHARDSON? See RIN 27311–an Abraham Richardson settled at New Creek, along with Solomon Hedges, Jacob Miller (William Smith was chain carrier and settled nearby).

1756–A WILLIAM AND HANNAH HALL IN RECORDS OF CONCORD MONTHLY MEETING, PENNSYLVANIA. HANNAH POSSIBLY ATTENDED HOPEWELL/FAIRFAX MEETINGS? OUR WILLIAM STARTED BUYING LORD FAIRFAX LAND IN VIRGINIA IN 1751 (see above 1708 reference). Note: Concord Friends’ Meeting was/is in Chester County, Pennsylvania. According to Hopewell Friends History 1734-1934, Frederick County, Virginia, Compiled by a joint committee of Hopewell Friends, assisted by John W. Wayland (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1975), p. 215, “FAIRFAX Meeting was in Waterford, in what is now (since 1757) Loudoun Co., Va. The first meeting house was built in 1741. Fairfax Monthly Meeting was established in 1744. See Janney’s History of the Friends, Vol. III, page 249. It would seem that the Friends held meetings in Fairfax as early as 1735 or 1736. The region was then in Prince William County”; p. 217: “HOPEWELL; 7 miles northeast of Winchester, in Frederick Co., Va.; named, it is said, for Hopewell in Lancaster Co., Pa. Prior to 1744, says Thomas H. Fawcett, Hopewell included Monoquacy and Fairfax.” (We Bartholomews, in company with my sister Virginia and her husband Barry D. Wood, visited charming Waterford, where Barry’s ancestors once lived, on our way back from visiting the Hall-Rion Estate on land where William Hall I and Hannah (Richardson) once lived. If Hannah was from the area where she and William eventually settled, and if she ever had or retained any Quaker leanings, there is a chance she attended Meeting at Waterford. –shb 8 May 2000

1762–A WILLIAM HALL DISCIPLINED AT CONCORD MONTHLY MEETING FOR PURCHASING NEGROES AS SLAVES (see above 1708 entry). Was this William a son of our William and Hannah? –shb 5 Nov 1999

1764–HUSBAND WILLIAM WRITES WILL: See husband William’s 1764 notes for a transcript of the will, in which William does not name his “loving wife” and in fact seems concerned that she might try to “Embazel” his estate and, also, for information about Hannah’ s dower land. –shb 3 Mar 2000

1775–A WILLIAM HALL DISMISSED FOR MARRYING OUT OF THE QUAKER FAITH (see 1708 entry above).

STORY/RICHARDSON MARRIAGE: Information on a Hannah Richardson Story, born 23 Mar 1794 to David Story and Rachel Richardson is in the Records of the Wrightstown Friends Monthly Meeting as recorded in Pennsylvania Births, Bucks County, 1682-1800, by John T. Humphrey, Humphrey Publications, Washington, D.C., 1993, p. 192. I at one time thought Story was the name of Hall neighbors in Frederick, Virginia, but I no longer find evidence of this–something to check out. There definitely were Story families in Chester County, Pennsylvania, where Hannah and William were married. [Note, I have since corresponded with Louise Kay Horton, who sent information about Story/Hall connection–see MRIN 4040 and about this Story/Richardson line with Jesse F. Hall, who reports his impression that this line has nothing to do with our Hall/Richardson line.] –shb 6 Nov 1999

QUAKER MONTHLY MEETINGS PROGRESSION: See notes of William Shipley (RIN 10168), for information about how the Quaker monthly Meetings were established and progressed in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and New Jersey. It is interesting that a Thomas West and Joseph Hewes, along with Joshua Way, were among friends who settled with William Shipley in Wilmington in 1736. In 1664 John Hussey, John Richardson (who had a son Richard), Edward Blake, George Hogg, Benjamin Sweet and other Friends settled in and near the town of New Castle, Delaware and held their first meetings in each other’s houses by permission of the Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting. In 1705 they bought a lot and built a meetinghouse. When the settlement of Friends above the Brandywine increased, the Newark Meeting established the New Castle [Delaware] Meeting, which was discontinued after declining in 1758. After that, its members attended the meetings at Wilmington. A Monthly Meeting was held in New Castle in 1686, but in 1687 this meeting decided that it was “more convenient for the present that the meeting be held twice on the other side of the Brandywine and the third which will be the Quarterly Meeting at New Castle.” It appears that from 1689-1704 the Monthly meeting was held “at Valentine Hollingsworth’s and other Friends’ Houses,”: and was called Newark Monthly Meeting, and then it was changed to George Harlan’s house at Centre. The last monthly meeting held at Newark was in 1707 [the year before a Richard Richardson of Newark m. Anna Robinson at Duck Creek MM, 19 May 1708–nine days after a George Robinson married Sarah, widow of Thomas Hall of Concord, at St. Paul’s Church, Chester–shb]. This meeting was usually held at Centre though sometimes at Kennett, from that date 1760, when it was changed to the Kennett Monthly Meeting. (Note: Kennet is in the town of Kennet Square, Chester County, Pa. Prior to 7154 Kennet was known as Newark, and originally as New Castle.) When a number of friends (Thomas West among them, as listed above) settled in 1736 at Wilmington, the Chester Quarterly Meeting was established at Wilmington: “Newark Monthly Meeting, on behalf of Friends living in and near Wilmington, do request that this Meeting would give the said Friends liberty of keeping meeting for worship on every first and fifth days of the week, which this meeting allows until further orders.” [Narrative continues with RIN 10168 notes.]

“The first meeting was held in the one-story brick house of William Shipley. Later meetings were held in William Shipley’s new house at the southwest corner of Fourth and Shipley Street, until the first meeting-house was completed in the fall of 1738. It was built of brick on the site of the Friends’ schoolhouse on West Street, and the date of the erection, 1738, was placed in the gable-wall with black glazed bricks.

“Benjamin Ferris, the historian, says this building was twenty-four feet square and one-story high. Originally a broad projecting roof extended across the entire southwest front. A sun-dial was placed over the small window under the peak of the roof in the south gable wall and remained there for sixty years or more. Within ten years after the establishment of this meeting, the society had become quite large. A great many Friends from New Castle and Newark Meetings came here regularly to worship, and those meetings declined. The first meeting-house was afterwards used exclusively for school purposes, and in a changed form is still standing. In 1748 another meeting-house was built on West Street on the site of the present one. It was forty-eight feet square, two-stories high, with galleries extending over one-half the ground floor. Over each of the doors was a double pitch roof, and elliptical arch over each of the windows in the first story. . . .

“Concord Quarterly Meeting, on the 14th of the Third Month, 1750, constituted Wilmington and New Castle Preparative Meetings, a Monthly Meeting for discipline, under the name of Wilmington Monthly Meeting. It was that year that the records of the Wilmington Meeting now in the hands of the society begin. In 1758 the same Quarterly Meeting advised the New Castle Preparative Meeting to resign its right of holding a meeting, and join that of Wilmington, which was done, and the New Castle meetinghouse was sold.” [Entire quote from History of Delaware, 1609-1888, by J. Thomas Scharf, Vol. I (L. J. Richards & Co., Philadelphia, 1888), p. 711.

Quaker Records of Northern Maryland 1716-1800, by Henry C. Peden, Jr., p. v. gives information about Quaker meetings there: “As a sequel [to records abstracted elsewhere in the area], the Quaker records through 1800 in northern Maryland have been abstracted for those meetings held in Baltimore City and the counties of Baltimore, Harford, Carroll, Howard and Frederick. These records begin in 1716 for the most part, although there are references within the records as early as 1674. Gunpowder Monthly meeting records begin in 1716 and include Patapsco and early Elk Ridge Meetings. [Note: Gunpowder is in Baltimore Co., Md., 16 miles north of Baltimore City, 18 miles west of Little Falls Meeting, Sparks being the nearest railway station–shb.] Baltimore Monthly Meeting separated from Gunpowder in 1792 and its records begin that year (although there is a record of deceased members which goes as far back as 1674) and include Patapsco and early Elk Ridge Meetings. Little Falls Monthly Meeting records begin in 1738, and include Forrest Meeting early in its history, but there are no monthly minutes until 1815. Deer Creek Monthly Meeting [in Harford Co. MD–shb] records begin in 1761, with some references back to 1741, and refer to meetings at Bush River and Susquehanna (or Bayside). Pipe Creek Monthly Meetings consisted of the two Preparative Meetings, one called Pipe Creek near present-day Union Bridge in Carroll County and Bush Creek Meeting in Frederick County. Both Meetings were initially formed as Preparative Meetings of Fairfax (Waterford) Monthly Meeting in Loudoun County, Virginia. The first Pipe Creek Monthly Meeting was held at Bush Creek in 1772, alternating thereafter between that site and Pipe Creek.”

WIDOWHOOD, 2nd WIFEHOOD? A JOHN RICHARDSON OF PASQUOTANK PRCT/WARD, ANDERSON CONNECTIONS: Hannah may have been a second wife. Will Book 4, pp. 407-408 mentions Hannah, widow of William Hall. Deed Book 11 of Frederick Co., Virginia 1765-1767 describes the tract of dower land which belonged to Hannah, “widow of William Hall.” Pasquotank County, North Carolina Record of Deeds 1700-1751, compiled by Gwen Boyer Bjorkman (Heritage Books, Inc.), p. 220 has an interesting entry: “[C:350] George [WARD] of Pasquotank prct. do Assign & make over all my right and Interest of the within written deed and Tract of Land therein Mentioned to John RICHARDSON of Pasquotank prct. …28 Jany 1733. Signed: George W. WARD his mark. Wit: Wm. Bryan, Ann Bryan. Ack: Aprl. Court George WARD to John RICHARDSON … Wit: Joseph ANDERSON. Regt: 8. the 29th. 1734.” Since Sarah Richardson’s (RIN 7946 of Philadelphia county, Pennsylvania) daughter married an Anderson and also has a Lane connection, there is the possibility that these families traveled together (before and after the families intermarried) and that there is a connection also to our Hannah Richardson of Virginia, wife of William Hall. –shb

Also among these Pasquotank deeds are such names as Thomas and Rebekah Symons, William, John and Peter Symons, Jeremiah Symons Junr., William Hall and Daniel Richardson (same deed), Stephen and Mary M. Richardson, George Harris, Thomas, John, Peter, and Robert Sawyer, “William Hall & Hannah my wife,” Benjamin and Charles West, Thomas Cooper, Henry White, John Davis, John Hall, Aquila Paca, Nathaniel Hall Sr. & Jr., Wm. Relfe, James Collins, David Baley, William Symons and Danl. Richardson (same deed), Fisher’s Corner tree, Geo Harris’s corner tree and LANE’s corner tree (mentioned in same deed – p. 140), Clement Hall, Thomas Hall, John and Ann Parish, Richard Collins. –shb

1746–SALEM COUNTY RICHARD RICHESON SELLS CHESTER COUNTY TAVERN: A William Hall was a prominent innkeeper in Salem County. Hall’s inn was located at the foot of Broadway and was built in 1691. Other innkeepers over the years were widow John Jones, Joseph Wood, Lodowick Hall, Samuel Baker, and David Briggs. This is more intersting, as regards our known ancestor, William Hall of West Virginia (RIN 677), who married Hannah Richardson (who had a brother named Richard) because I find an abstract from the Philadelphia Gazette, where a Richard Richeson is involved in trying to sell a White Horse Tavern in nearby Chester Co. in 1746. Our William Hall and Hannah Richardson were married in 1731 in Chester, Pennsylvania. Above abstract reads: “White Horse Tavern (lately possessed by James Trego, dec’d) in Whiteland Twp., Chester Co., for 30 years a tavern, on the great Conestogoe Rd., 25 Miles from Phila. – is to be sold; to learn of the title and conditions of sale, apply to James Trego, now living thereon, or to Richard Richison, living near said place; also part of the estate and for sale is a brick house, a tavern, where Israel Hendrickson now lives, opposite the courthouse in the Borough of Chester; apply to Thomas Cummings or Jacob Howell in said borough (9 Oct.)” (1746 listings, Abstracts From Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, 1728-1748, by Kenneth Scott, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1975), pp. 584-585.) –shb June, 1997

SALEM COUNTY LOCATION/HISTORY: The first division of East and West Jersey into counties was made in 1682. At that time the counties of Burlington and Salem were created. Originally Salem County also included all of Gloucester, Cape May, and Cumberland counties. In 1686 Gloucester was formed to include what is now Atlantic County. Cape May County was established in 1692, Cumberland in 1748. Salem County was primarily a Quaker settlement, but the Swedes were there first and were attached to the Lutheran congregations of New Castle, Delaware, and made frequent trips across the river to transact church business. Old Deeds in Possession of the Salem County [New Jersey] Historical Society, Unrecorded Deeds indexed by Elmer Garfield Van Nam

RICHARDSON/HALL/STRODE/POTTS CONNECTION? Thomas Hall, supposedly the father of Hannah’s spouse, William Hall I, lived in Old Concord, Chester, Pennsylvania right next to a George Stroude. Other neighbors were Moores and Keys, also names, with Strodes, who are found in Frederick County, Virginia. An Elizabeth Richardson, daughter of Richard Richardson (RIN 10160–Hannah had a brother named Richard Richardson) and Sarah Tatnall, m. 29 Oct 1789, a Samuel Stroud (RIN 12729), of New Castle Co., Pennsylvania, son of James Stroud of Plimoth, Montgomery, Pennsylvania. I find in Frederick County records a Samuel Stroud (RIN 23857), d. 1765 in Loudoun Co., VA, who m. Ann. Samuel and Ann had a daughter Mary, who m. Jonas Potts. A widowed Elizabeth Hall Potts m. Jacob Allstadt, who kept the tavern on land that adjoins the William Hall I burial plot. –shb 2 Feb 2000

RUTHERFORD CONNECTION? Pioneers of Old Frederick County, Virginia, by Cecil O’Dell (Marceline, Missouri: Walsworth Publishing Co., 1995) gives much information on this family (see index), and includes information that Robert Rutherford was a surveyor of land for Lord Fairfax in early Virginia and also some Rutherford Connections to the Hall family. –shb 30 Oct 1999

HER LAND/RUTHERFORD CONNECTION: See notes of Richard Richardson of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, RIN 20955. From a booklet by Don C. Wood, tracing Hall land (for more information see husband William Hall’s notes): “William Hall wrote a will on October 21, 1764, probated 4 December 1764. He divided his land among his children. To son William Hall he gave the land where said William lived and below his plantation to son James Hall; the northern section he gave to son Richard Hall. His old plantation was to be divided between sons John Hall and Anthony Hall [our ancestor]. To son Thomas Hall and Joseph Hall he gave his new ‘dwelling and the mill thereon.’ But all of the above tract of land were only to his sons for their life time and then to their eldest son or daughter. He gave to his son William Hall the right to cut hay around his mill and 3 acres of the meadow next to the mill to his son James Hall. His children were to have the right to have their grain ground ‘tool free’ at the mill for their life time. To his daughters Elizabeth Pemberton, Ruth Heavin, Hannah Harris and Sarah Keyes he left his new survey which was to be sold by his executors and the money divided between them. To his beloved wife, sister of Richard Richardson, he gave his stock and everything on his plantation for her life. (Frederick Co., Va. Will Book 3, page 233). [Actually one wonders how beloved she was when you read the original will–he seemed concerned that she might try to embezzle his property–shb.]

HANNAH’S DOWER LAND LAID OFF BY ROBERT RUTHERFORD LAND OTHERS (Don C. Wood, continued) “Hannah Hall, the widow of William Hall I, petitioned the Court for her dower land from her husband’s estate since the will had not allowed any land in August 1765. Jacob Hite and Robert Rutherford [see his notes, RIN 23512–shb] and others laid off Hannah Hall’s dower land of 690 acres. [As recorded in the notes of Hannah’s son William, in 1830, William Lucas married Virginia Ann Bedinger, a daughter of Sarah Rutherford and Daniel Bedinger of nearby Shepherdstown, and as I understand it, they lived on the Hall-Rion estate, built on what was once the land of our ancestors William I and Hannah (Richardson), that we once visited when we were in Halltown, Jefferson, West Virginia.–shb] This land was hers only for her life time and then went to the various sons which it had been assigned to (Frederick Co., Va. Deed Book 11, page 175.)” [This name “Rutherford” is interesting. See MRIN 8484–a Thomas Hall (RIN 20517), cooper, of Lower Norfolk, Virginia, born before 1631, marries a Margery Rutherford; see also, notes of RIN 20518–a Reuben Rutherford involved in land deed on same page as another entry involving a Wm. Hall who testifies about Borden land, part of 92100–shb 11 Mar 1999.]

ROBERT RUTHERFORD [See his notes, RIN 23512]: A History of Jefferson County, West Virginia, by Millard Kessler Bushong (Charles Town, West Virginia: Jefferson Publishing Co., 1941), p. 80: “ROBERT RUTHERFORD. About the time these riflemen reached Roxbury one of their neighbors was playing an important role in Virignia. He was Robert Rutherford of near Charles Town [the Wm. Hall property was very near Charles Town–shb], who, as a member of the Virginia Convention of 1775 meeting in Williamsburg, helped to decide on her course in the Revolution. He was one of the seven delegates chosen by the Convention to reply to Lord Dunmore’s proclamation demanding that Virginians either join the british army or be held as rebels. On December 13, 1775, he signed a declaration stating that the relations between England and Virginia were forever severed. [paragraph] the committee then laid the foundation for the successful prosecutionof the war for independence. To this end pardons were promised all slaves who had taken up arms in behalf of the mother country in response to Dunmore’s proclamation promising freedom. These pardons were granted only on condition that those affected would resume their status as slaves [footnote 8–not copied out–shb].

1764–HANNAH’S WIDOWED STATE: See above paragraph and notes of Hannah’s son-in-law, Humphrey Keyes, for information about the inventory of William’s estate and the cash Hannah possessed at his death. –shb

1768–BROTHER RICHARD STILL IN CHESTER COUNTY, PA? Tax List of Chester County 1768, pertaining to the inhabitants of the Chester County, including the present day county of Delaware, (Westminster, Maryland: Family Line Publications), p. 93, lists as a Radnor Twp. inmate a Richard Richardson (it was not unusual to jail people for simply being in debt). This same tax list, p. 94, names those paying the “East Whiteland Rate,” including a Richard Richardson with 84 acres, 3 horses, 4 cattle, 6 sheep, and 0 slaves (directly underneath his name is written “Estate of Kelly to Rich’d Richardson,” with no listings across). See 1768 notes of supposed father-in-law, Thomas Hall, RIN 7435, for a more complete account of this tax list, including other Richardsons and Halls. –shb 2 Mar 2000

SIBLINGS? Mom (Ida-Rose L. Hall) has notes about a Samuel Richardson, brother to Hannah, who named William Hall in his will, as having been paid l00 pounds by Samuel. Samuel also paid l00 lbs. to Philip Richardson, with the rest of his estate going to Meriam Richardson (his wife?–shb) at her decease. Samuel also mentioned having brothers and sisters. Witness to this will was Richard Thomas (also an executor) and another witness was Milkah Richardson. Mom could not decipher the source for this will. In other notes she has is mentioned that a Samuel Richardson Sr. names a sister Sarah Pierpoint and another sister, Elizabeth Burkett. This is interesting since Richard Richardson Jr., a Quaker (RIN 2552) married a Mary Pierpont 13 Sep 1762. Since Hannah married in 1731, they are a generation apart. Fairfax Monthly Meeting, Virginia records did not list a Hannah as one of Richard and Mary’s six children, though they did have a Samuel, a Sarah, and an Elizabeth who married John Brown 29 Jan 1795.

Mom has notes that Samuel Jr., son of Samuel Richardson (brother of Hannah) married a Hannah Brooks, as Samuel referred to a brother-in-law Brooks in some document she researched. Also, a daughter of this Samuel (Jr?) married a William Matthews. This will need additional research, as we could not find her source at the time.

June 2, 1993 at the National Genealogical Convention in Baltimore, Md., which Mom Ida-Rose Hall, brother-in-law Barry Wood and I (Sherlene) attended, Barry found an interesting reference in a back issue of magazines he purchased titled: Western Maryland Genealogy, Vol. 2. No. 2, Apr. 1986, p. 78: “SAMUEL RICHARDSON of Frederick Co. Will dtd. 29 Jan. 1764. To William Richardson: L100.2.6, which I formerly paid William Hall for said William Richardson. To Philip Richardson: L100 to be paid in pieces of eight at 7.6 each. To wife Meriam for life: negroes Arthur, Jack, Isaac, Jean and her six children, and at her decease, she shall give them to my brothers and sisters or their children. Also the rest of my estate forever to Meriam, she and Richard Thomas exec. /s/ Samuel Richardson. Wit: Richard Thomas, Mileah Richardson. On 29 Feb. 1764, Richard Thomas refused to serve as executor (test. Joseph Richdson). Will proved 29 March 1764 by wit (pp. 208-209).

See RIN 20898–William and Martha Parham name a daughter Nancy Lucas, 3/17/1769, with a sponsor named Rebecca Lucas; also, a Steth and Eliz. Parham parents of Elizabeth, chr. 17 Dec 1755, with sponsors Robert Wynne, Susanna Hall, Eliz. Wynn (see RIN 20884–a Wm. Richardson has a dau. Mary, married a Wynne). –shb 15 Mar 1999

HER LAND/RUTHERFORD CONNECTION: See notes of Richard Richardson of Lower Norfolk County, Virginia, RIN 20955. From a booklet by Don C. Wood, tracing Hall land (for more information see husband William Hall’s notes): “William Hall wrote a will on October 21, 1764, probated 4 December 1764. He divided his land among his children. To son William Hall he gave the land where said William lived and below his plantation to son James Hall; the northern section he gave to son Richard Hall. His old plantation was to be divided between sons John Hall and Anthony Hall [our ancestor]. To son Thomas Hall and Joseph Hall he gave his new ‘dwelling and the mill thereon.’ But all of the above tract of land were only to his sons for their life time and then to their eldest son or daughter. He gave to his son William Hall the right to cut hay around his mill and 3 acres of the meadow next to the mill to his son James Hall. His children were to have the right to have their grain ground ‘tool free’ at the mill for their life time. To his daughters Elizabeth Pemberton, Ruth Heavin, Hannah Harris and Sarah Keyes he left his new survey which was to be sold by his executors and the money divided between them. To his beloved wife, sister of Richard Richardson, he gave his stock and everything on his plantation for her life. (Frederick Co., Va. Will Book 3, page 233). [Actually one wonders how beloved she was when you read the original will–he seemed concerned that she might try to embezzle his property–shb.]

“Hannah Hall, the widow of William Hall I, petitioned the Court for her dower land from her husband’s estate since the will had not allowed any land in August 1765. Jacob Hite and Robert Rutherford and others laid off Hannah Hall’s dower land of 690 acres. [As recorded in the notes of Hannah’s son William, in 1830, William Lucas married Virginia Ann Bedinger, a daughter of Sarah Rutherford and Daniel Bedinger of nearby Shepherdstown, and as I understand it, they lived on the Hall-Rion estate, built on what was once the land of our ancestors William I and Hannah (Richardson), that we once visited when we were in Halltown, Jefferson, West Virginia.–shb] This land was hers only for her life time and then went to the various sons which it had been assigned to (Frederick Co., Va. Deed Book 11, page 175.)” [This name “Rutherford” is interesting. See MRIN 8484–a Thomas Hall (RIN 20517), cooper, of Lower Norfolk, Virginia, born before 1631, marries a Margery Rutherford; see also, notes of RIN 20518–a Reuben Rutherford involved in land deed on same page as another entry involving a Wm. Hall who testifies about Borden land, part of 92100–shb 11 Mar 1999.]

See notes of Hannah’s son-in-law, Humphrey Keyes, for information about the inventory of William’s estate and the cash Hannah possessed at his death. –shb

RICHARDSON/HALL CONNECTION IN THE OLD COUNTRY? See notes of RIN 7942 for a possible family link of Richardsons to Halls in England. Hannah’s husband William’s father was, according to an Ancestral File lead, Thomas Hall of Concord, Pennsylvania. An old Delaware County, Pennsylvania history I found at BYU said this Thomas Hall was of Hilmarton, Wiltshire, England. At the Society of Genealogists in London, April of 1997, I found a will of a James Hall of Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, who had a brother Thomas and whose will was signed by a Thos. Lane. In my PAF file I had already extracted notes of an Edward Lane (RIN 7943) of Philadelphia (son of Wm. Lane and Cecilia Love of Bristol, England) who married Anne Richardson, daughter of Samuel (who came with his wife Eleanor from Barbados to Philadelphia in 1684 and became very prominent and prosperous). Anne and Edward married before 1690 and had a child, Edward Lane, in Providence, Pennsylvania. How this Richardson connects with Hannah, if at all, and if these Halls in Westbury Leigh are connected to our Halls, still needs verification. It is interesting that Hannah named her second son James. –shb 6/19/97

BROTHER RICHARD NAMED IN HUSBAND WILLIAM’S WILL, 1764: Hannah had a brother, Richard Richardson (Will of Wm. Hall–Will Bk No. 3 pp 233-235, Frederick Co., Winchester, Va., unless he was calling a fellow Friend of hers “brother”–which I doubt [see Notes, RIN 677]). Also see notes of a Richard Richardson in New Castle, Delaware, RIN 10160–not yet linked. This is probably the Richard who was appointed a justice for Kent County in 1726 [A Richard Richardson of Newark m. Anna Robinson at Duck Creek MM, which is in Kent County, on 19 May 1708, a week after George Robinson m. Sarah, widow of Thomas Hall of Concord, 10 May 1708, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Chester–shb], along with a John Hall, and whose father was probably the John who was appointed that same year as a justice for New Castle County (p. 133 of Scharf’s History of Delaware, cited below). Also, Richard Richardson, Jr., RIN 7718, b. 1742, is very interesting. He has some right names in his ancestry to correspond with Hannah’s children’s names, and he was married to Mary Pierpont in the Fairfax Meeting in Loudoun County, Virginia (his parents were from Anne Arundel County, Maryland). There were a lot of children in these Richardson families to name “Richard,” and I’ve been gathering any I could find, hoping to find this missing link in our direct ancestry. –shb

A BROTHER/GRANDFATHER JOSEPH? Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia, Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County 1745-1800, by Lyman Chalkley, Vol. I (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1965), p. 150: “August 18, 1768 (315) Mary Richardson, orphan of Joseph Richardson, to be bound to Mathew Robertson” [on this same date, records mention a Jacob and Catherine Miller, James Hall, Constable, John Hannah (to build a mill on Collier’s Creek), and a Francis Smith, administrator of David Miller]. A Joseph Richardson was a single tithable in Southwark Parish, Surry County, Virginia, taken June 10, 1702. Others listed that year were (numbers in brackets refer to other persons who were tithables on the same plantation, and I gather that the other number refers to the number of tithables in the person’s household): William Lucius . . 2, Ed. Simons . . 1, John Simons (28) . . 4, William Simonds . . 5, William Lucus . . 2, Richard Miller (48) . . 0, John Harris . . 1, Richard Harris (46) . . 3, Jeremiah Ellis . . 1, and Anthony Hall . . 1 (Colonial Surry, by John B. Boddie (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1974), p. 209). –shb 21 Feb 1999].

9/96 – shb: Another possible brother of Hannah’s is the Richard Richardson mentioned as a son-in-law in the Chester County, Pennsylvania wills of James and Rachel Starr (RIN 15527 and RIN 15528).

Thomas Tatnall or Tatuall married Ann Shipley, sister of Wm Shipley [see RIN 10175]. Thomas’s brother, Edward Tatnall, had a daughter Sarah who married a Richard Richardson, son of John, who was the son of John Richardson. This Richard Richardson [RIN 10160] was born in 1720. Benjamin Ferris, the historian, said that Thomas and Ann Tatuall settled near Darby and Chester [Pennsylvania].

1726 SMITH WILL–CONNECTION? Abstracts of Wills of Chester, Pennsylvania, Vol. I, 1714-1755, by Miss Katherine Reynolds, Houston, Texas, 1971 (Salt Lake Film # 0893738044-001 – available at the HBBL at Brigham Young University), p. 44, gives the will of a William Smith, written 9 Apr 1726 and probated 8 Jan 1727 (see RIN 10116 for an early marriage of a William Smith to a Richardson). This Wm. Smith mentions grandchildren named Pearson and a Samuel Levis (See RIN 10169) as an executor. Witness to the will is William Shipley (see RIN 10168). William’s daughter Sarah Shipley married a Robert Richardson, b. 1708, who had a younger sister, Hannah, born in 1721. She had a slightly older brother Richard, born 1720. However, I already have two marriages for this Hannah born in 1721. The point is that this William Smith will is found in Chester County wills on the same roll on which I find a Thomas Hall, presumably the father of Hannah Richardson’s husband, William, though a William is not mentioned in this will. This Thomas Hall will was written a little earlier in 1704 and probated in 1717. Familiar West Virginia names are in these Chester County records: Ellis, Key, Hedge, Wood, Cooper, Parker, Rose, Scarlett, Alexander, Strickland, Thompson, Warren, West, Montgomery, Houston, House, Howard, Henry, Ewing, Evitt. Also on this film, p. 19 is a will of Richard Arnold of Thornbury, dated 7 10 mo. 1720 and probated 30 Dec 1720, which has as witnesses Ann Vearnon, William Clure, and John Taylor. I wish I had the reference, but I read somewhere that this Richard used “Arnold” as an alias for Richardson. This Richard Arnold’s wife was Sarah, and he named sons Anthony, William, Sarah, Thomas, Josiah, Richard, Grace (wife of Ralph Eavenson, and Elizabeth (wife of Richard Pirtchard [sic]). On this roll I also find the will of an Isaac Richardson, written 14 Oct 1726 and probated 12 Nov 1726, that mentions wife Catherine and daughters Mary, Elizabeth, Elinor and Martha and son, Jehew (see notes of RIN 9574). –shb

See notes of Hannah’s son Anthony for a clue about an Anthony Richardson from White Haven, Great Britain–perhaps where Anthony got his name? See notes of Robert Richardson, RIN 7816, who came to Virginia from England and then moved to Maryland. It speaks of a William Richardson who came to Virginia in the 1600’s and then also moved to Maryland. See notes of Thomas Richardson, RIN 10868 for a possible connection of this Maryland family to an Anthony Richardson (with a brother, Richard Richardson “of New York,”) who died in Barbados. –shb

While in Dedham, Mass., May of 1991, I talked at length with Robert B. Hanson, town historian, at the historical society there. He showed me a book, The Richardson Memorial, Comprising a Full History and Genealogy of the Posterity of the Three Brothers, Ezekiel, Samuel, and Thomas Richardson (who came from England and united with others in the Foundation of Woburn, Mass., in the year 1641), of John Richardson, of Medfield, 1679, of Amos Richardson of Boston, 1640, of Edward and William Richardson of Newbury, 1643, with Notices of Richardsons in England and Elsewhere), by John Adams Vinton, Portland, ME, Brown Thurston & Co., 1876.

In the above source (my time was limited), I did not find direct evidence of Hannah’s parentage. However, on p. 25, in a list of “fragmentary material relating to the early times…here preserved,” I found two items regarding Richard Richardsons: “Richard Richardson and Hannah Williams were married July 8, 1703;” “Richard Richardson and Sarah Balch were married March 3, 1711-12.” Of four daughters of William Hall and Sarah Richardson, the last two listed in his will were named Hannah and Sarah [however, these were common names–I know I’m scratching for clues–shb].

While in Dedham, I copied out a marriage from Robert B. Hanson’s book of The Vital Records of Dedham, Massachusetts, Vol. 3: Marriages 1638-1844 (Heritage Books, Inc.), p. 155: “Timothy [Richardson] of Wrentham [Mass.] int 6/12/1776 Betty Haven.” (Date adjusted to New Style, except for day.) This is of interest, because the Havens lived near Hannah Richardson in West Virginia–how the family got up to Dedham, I don’t know–but there must be a connection. I do not see any Timothys among William and Hannah’s children–not yet, but there is a chance this Timothy is a child of Hannah’s daughter Ruth, who married a Haven–perhaps the Timothys come on his line. –shb

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